The QoE 12th March, Quo Vadis, London

The QoE 12th March, Quo Vadis, London

Topic: Should customer and employee experience outcomes
be aligned?
 

To join us, please just reserve your place.

At its simplest, customer experience (CX) has been good at improving products and services, and generally enhancing how customers are treated by companies. In return, companies who provide good CX have seen increases in sales, loyalty and reputation.

So employee experience (EX) should therefore be good at improving the working environment and support services, and generally enhancing how employees are treated. In return, companies will see improved productivity at a lower cost, increased employee retention and reputational gain.

But is this really the case?

Looking at CX and EX in this way would suggest companies see them as such, and will act accordingly.

Other companies are taking the view that the two are interconnected: happy employees = happy customers. But while this may well be true in the service world, especially with voice on chat interactions, does this work as we move away from direct contact with customers?

There is no doubt that companies who are good at both CX and EX can be extremely successful if they can maintain standards in both. Unfortunately for some, the digital agenda has reduced direct interaction and undermined employees’ faith in their future. This produces a negative impact on employee experience, and in turn effects customers who are used to interacting with happy motivated employees.

Morning session: comparing the outcomes of CX and EX

  • Can we define the objective and outcomes of CX and EX?
  • What are the benefits of aligning the outcomes of CX and EX, and what are the risks?
  • If we truly want to improve CX and EX, how can we design the outcomes to be mutually reinforcing?
  • What are the secrets of those companies who get this right, and what are the rewards?

Lunch: quickfire questions from the table

Afternoon session: actions and outcomes

  • Deciding on the best approach to CX and EX outcomes for your business
  • Developing actions about where to align outcomes, and where to diverge
Engaging and learning from our employees

Engaging and learning from our employees

Our guest panelists:

  • Andy Incles, Head of Store Resourcing and Scheduling, Marks and Spencers
  • Jonathan Cann, Global HEad of CRM, Namecheap

You’ve probably heard of unconscious bias by now. So how might it be affecting your ability to listen to your customers, and your employees?

We now have more data than ever. But the problem is that we can always find the data we need to justify our own views.

If you are hearing lots of things that you agree with, there’s a real danger that you’re in an echo chamber. The challenge – and the solution – is to find ways to change what you’re hearing, and how you’re listening to it.

Talk to some people outside your normal sphere of influence. Look at a different dataset. Actively read the negative comments in your survey. Then, and most importantly, take time to listen to what these genuine opinions are telling you.  

Among the questions we discuss in this episode are:

  • How do we choose who (and what) to listen to? And not just hear what we want to hear?
  • How can we get a balanced view of employee experience when you have a large and diverse workforce?
  • How might you use technology to bring you views from outside your echo chamber?

Don’t forget: you can get your questions answered by our ExperienceCast panel. Just send us your question, and we’ll feature it in one of our forthcoming episodes.

Listen to more ExperienceCast podcasts

What is the relationship between customer and employee insight?

What is the relationship between customer and employee insight?

A lot of people we talk with are doing great things with customer insight. They’re collecting rich data from multiple sources, and using sophisticated analytics to make informed decisions.

But a lot fewer are doing great things with employee insight.

This is a wasted opportunity. Data from employees not only enables us to learn more about how to improve their experience, it can also show us a great deal about how to improve our customers’ experience.

In this week’s ExperienceCast, we explored the question of how to get more out of the relationship between customer and employee insight. Several key points came out of the discussion, including:

  • There’s a big difference between gathering insight and actually listening to what your customers and employees are saying. You have to want to listen.
  • Employee experience data can greatly enhance understanding of customer experience, but many organisations are not yet making effective use of this data.
  • Customer and employee insight is problem pointing to the same issues, but just from a different viewpoint.
  • The one thing worse than not gathering insight is to gather insight and not do anything with it, especially in the area of employee experience.

Are you making great use of employee insight? And how are you connecting your employee insight data with your customer insight?

We’d love to hear more about what you’re doing, so why not leave us a comment below?

Listen to more ExperienceCast podcasts

 

Photo by M. B. M. on Unsplash
The QoE 23rd January, Quo Vadis, London

The QoE 23rd January, Quo Vadis, London

Topic: If 2020 is the year of the employee, what does this mean for customer experience?

 

Employee experience is increasingly recognised as a priority in developing sustainable businesses. But what does this mean for customer experience?

Our last discussion highlighted need for alignment across customer and employee experience. Both these areas have a shared objective in using experience to underpin the success of a company. It therefore stands to reason that both areas will share similar approaches to creating value, such as surveys, workshops and journey mapping.

But surprisingly, the biggest difference in customer and employee experience seems to be in how insight is collected, valued and used to drive actions.

If 2020 is to be the year of the employee, we need to look the different types of employee insight and clearly link the findings to tangible ROI. The combination of customer and employee insight will provide a more complete picture to help us develop a whole range of improvements.

Morning Session: how can employee experience help us to

  • optimise business performance?
  • develop and retain talent?
  • become truly customer-centric?
  • create opportunities for innovation and agility?
  • improve employee wellbeing?
  • foster a positive working environment?

Lunch: quickfire questions from the table

Afternoon session: actions and outcomes

  • Identifying your priorities for employee experience
  • Considering how analytics can help you
  • Developing actions that move the needle on employee experience

To join us, please just get in touch with Tony at tony.reeves@theqoe.com.